Theses (Hardware)

 

Microscopic simulation of modern gaseous detectors

Performance studies of GEM detectors

Construction of a reference detector for quality control of scintillator trigger modules

 

Modern Muon Detectors

Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is the most modern gas detector technology available. Its flexibility and durability permit applications from high energy physics experiments to medical instrumentation. The innovative detection principle opens a new era in detector physics and offers virtually unlimited opportunities for discoveries.

The DT muon chambers of the CMS experiment will receive completely renewed, FPGA-based signal processing electronics for the high-luminosity phase of the LHC. It will also be tested in our cosmic muon detector test stand.

 

Microscopic simulation of modern gaseous detectors

GEM Avalanche Copyright: © M. Seidel

To have a better understanding of the results coming from the experiments, the simulations of such underlying physical processes are essential. The goal of the thesis is to simulate signal propagation in GEM chambers on a microscopic scale using the GARFIELD environment.

Contact: Kerstin Hoepfner (26A 204), Francesco Ivone (28A 220)

 
 

Performance studies of GEM detectors

GEM detector physics group Copyright: © H. Keller

Guided by the results obtained in the simulations of GEM detectors, a wide number of parameters are being tested on prototype chambers. The goal of the thesis is the characterization of the performance of a GEM chamber, using quantities such as efficiency and gas gain. Measurements will be performed under different conditions to optimize these parameters.

Contact: Shawn Zaleski (28A 220), Kerstin Hoepfner (26A 204), Francesco Ivone (28A 220)

 
 
 

Construction of a reference detector for quality control of scintillator trigger modules

Reference detector with scintillator strips Copyright: © D. Eliseev

Our test stand for investigating detectors for measuring cosmic muons will be extended by several layers of scintillator tiles as trigger detectors. For quality control of these tiles, a smaller reference detector needs to be constructed from several layers of scintillator strips read out by silicon photomutipliers (SiPM). With this reference detector, traces of cosmic muons will be reconstructed to determine, where these muons have passed through the scintillator tiles to be investigated and whether a signal was reliably generated. As part of the bachelor's thesis, the reference detector is to be set up and tested in collaboration with the mechanical and electronics workshops of our institute, with housings for the scintillator strips and SiPM and the associated readout electronics. Helpful prerequisites for carrying out the thesis are, for example, an interest in detector physics, initial knowledge of electronics and programming, some experience in working with RaspberryPi or Arduino and basic experience with Linux and Python.

Contact: Dmitry Eliseev (Ha 110), Markus Merschmeyer (26A 203)