Possible Theses Topics (Hardware)

 

Microscopic simulation of modern gaseous detectors

Performance studies of GEM detectors

Cosmic Test Stand

Operations and studies of performance of Drift Tube Chamber for the Aachen Cosmic Stand

Characterization of SiPMs for the Aachen Cosmic Stand

Characterization of scintillator tiles for the Aachen Cosmic Stand

 

Modern Muon Detectors

Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) is the most modern gas detector technology available. Its flexibility and durability permit applications from high energy physics experiments to medical instrumentation. The innovative detection principle opens a new era in detector physics and offers virtually unlimited opportunities for discoveries.

 

Microscopic simulation of modern gaseous detectors

GEM Avalanche Copyright: M. Seidel

To have a better understanding of the results coming from the experiments, the simulations of such underlying physical processes are essential. The goal of the thesis is to simulate signal propagation in GEM chambers on a microscopic scale using the GARFIELD environment.

Contact: Kerstin Hoepfner, Francesco Ivone (office 28A 220)

 
 

Performance studies of GEM detectors

GEM detector physics group Copyright: H. Keller

Guided by the results obtained in the simulations of GEM detectors, a wide number of parameters are being tested on prototype chambers. The goal of the thesis is the characterization of the performance of a GEM chamber, using quantities such as efficiency and gas gain. Measurements will be performed under different conditions to optimize these parameters.

Contact: Shawn Zaleski, Kerstin Hoepfner, Francesco Ivone (Office 28A 220 or 26A 204)

 
 
 

Cosmic Test Stand

Cosmic Test Stand Copyright: D. Eliseev

The Cosmic Stand Aachen is a challenging project that aims to integrate multiple types of detectors in a versatile stand. The different nature of the deployed detectors allows reconstruction of cosmic muon tracks. The dedicated modern electronics will provide high spatial resolution, precise timing information while covering a large area. These characteristics allow to precisely explore the properties of state-of-the-art muon detectors.

Contact: Dmitry Eliseev, Markus Merschmeyer (Offices HA 110 or 26A 203)

 

Operations and studies of performance of Drift Tube Chamber for the Aachen Cosmic Stand

The key detector present in the Aachen Cosmic Teststand is the Drift-Tube (DT) chamber. After the complex upgrade of the cosmic test stand's infrastructure, the performance of the DT chamber must be verified. The goal of the thesis is to test the performance of the DT chamber. As a part of the performance check the characterization of single gas tubes should be provided. The characterization procedure should be developed to determine optimal operation conditions.

Contact: Dmitry Eliseev, Markus Merschmeyer (Office Ha 110 or 26A 203)

 
 

Characterization of SiPMs for the Aachen Cosmic Stand

SiPMs Copyright: private

SiPMs are sensitive photo detectors that are planned for use in the trigger system of Aachen CosmicTeststand. In order to optimise the trigger system the SiPMs and the front end electronics have to be characterised. The bias voltage applied to the SiPMs differ from part to part and have to be measured under well defined conditions e.g. Vbias @ 25degC. Increasing the bias voltage increases the gain, but also the dark noise. Therefore a sensible compromise has to be found. The SiPMs are then used to provide a trigger signal. The time jitter of the trigger signal is also of great interest and should be measured.

Contact: Dmitry Eliseev, Shawn Zaleski, Markus Merschmeyer (Office Ha110 or 28A 220 or 26A 203)

 

Characterization of scintillator tiles for the Aachen Cosmic Stand

Scintillator tiles are read out by 4 SiPMs. It is to be determined if the SiPMs should be placed at the corners or the edges of the tile. Therefore the sensitivity of the detector has to be measured for each configurations (signal vs. position). In addition to that it should be investigated if the pulse heights of all 4 SiPMs can be used to estimate the position of the ionizing particle within the tile.

Contact: Dmitry Eliseev, Shawn Zaleski, Markus Merschmeyer (office Ha 110 or 28A 220 or 26A 203)